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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 5, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. this is business live from bbc news welcome to breakfast with with maryam moshiri and victoria charlie stayt and naga munchetty. fritz. our headlines today: the granddaddy of all trade deals. president trump holds out hope that a huge agreement between the us a12 and china can be reached. a 12 month extension to brexit, reports of a new offer being put live from london, together by the president of the that's our top story on friday 5th april. european council. good morning, the head of boeing accepts welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega minchetty for the first time that crucial our headlines today... software is linked to the fatal crashes of two of its aircraft. it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we own it and we know how to do it. a12 a 12 month extension to brexit. reports of a new rfid being put despite the great progress, the together by the president of the latest talks in washington, there european council. —— a new offer. are several crucial areas still to good morning. be resolved. is an end to the trade saving more, for old age. the head of boeing accepts for the first time that crucial if you pay into a workplace war really insight. also in the pension — it'll be more programme, boeing admit for the software is linked to the fatal crashes of two of its aircraft. expensive from tomorrow. first time that a controversial i'm looking at how much anti—stall first time that a controversial a nti —stall system first time that a controversial it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. it could cost you. anti—stall system was to blame for we own it and we know how to do it. good morning, can't wait to quit the two crashes of 737 max—8 game. england defender danny rose, a growing problem — says racist abuse means he's the gender pay gap is getting worse, had enough of football. with nearly half of the uk's biggest employers still — on average — this morning we are talking food paying men more than women. feet rather than food miles. raw unpasteurised milk from these can't wait to quit the game. ladies, to the bottle, to the
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england defender danny rose says customer. it's becoming very racist abuse means he's had enough of football. popular. the challenge is to make sure it's as safe as possible for eve ryo ne sure it's as safe as possible for everyone to drink. not only will i be bringing you raw, unpasteurised milk is becoming increasingly popular. so the big cracking views from london but news challenge now, how to ensure its of the weather turning a little safe as possible for people to drier and less chilly towards the drink. weekend. join me for that on and i've got some better news on the horizon for this weekend as things brea kfast. turned dry. still a bit wet today it is friday the 5th of april. gci’oss turned dry. still a bit wet today across parts of western england, wales and northern ireland. but donald tusk is proposing to of the things will get better. i'll have uk are flexible brexit extension of the details on this little hidden one year, that's according to a gem looking over london here on senior eu official. britain is due to leave the european union a week brea kfast. today and as yet no withdrawal deal it's friday 5th april. has been approved by mps. we will our top story. the european council president talk to alex forsyth in westminster donald tusk could offer the uk a "flexible" brexit ina talk to alex forsyth in westminster in a moment but first let's go to extension of one year, according to a senior eu official. brussels and join adam fleming. you meanwhile, the attorney general geoffrey cox has said there's likely knew this was going to happen, to be a lengthy delay if cross—party apparently? i didn't know it was talks with jeremy corbyn don't succeed. going to happen! thank you, though. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. how will this offer go down here? this idea has been floating around for a little while. do you remember
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last month when it first reared its head and theresa may fayre suggested she was going to have to ask for an good morning to you. i can imagine lots of people waking up this extension to the brexit process? the morning saying, what? 12 months? where did this come from? you would request was going to be for a longer extension but with the option of think so. first thing to say is that coming out earlier if parliament none of this is certain. there are managed to get through the deal lots of conversations at the moment earlier. that is where we seem to be about what might happen over the ending up now except the dates have next week or so. what we hearing shifted forward a few months, from courses macro sources is they because the process has taken a bit might look at this concept and say longer. the idea donald tusk is you can have a long extension then putting on the table, after speaking if you manage to get a brexit deal to some eu leaders is being called a through we can cut it short and you can leave. if that's the case, and it isa can leave. if that's the case, and it is a big if because the 27 eu countries would have to sign up, it flex tension, and end date of next could be a rare bit of news were spring for the brexit process but if number10. we could be a rare bit of news were number 10. we know the prime minister was getting ready to ask parliament got the withdrawal agreement through and voted for a short extension anyway because she doesn't want the uk to leave unfavourably, the uk could leave earlier, which means theresa may without a deal next friday, so if could still aim for her target date this offer was on the table it could of leaving the eu on the 22nd of be that she could come back to parliament and say, look, we can may. it's worth remembering what either have a long extension what donald tusk‘sjob is in all of you can get behind my brexit deal theirs. he speaks to the leaders and and we can leave quickly. they might
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tries to find a point a consensus think that can focus on some mines. they can all agree with but the of course we know she is still decision is in the hands of the leaders when they are in the room. having conversations about whether or not care and the labour party can he will have to convince some come up with anything. —— anything leaders of some countries that an that will be palatable to mps in the extension this long is a good idea because some are worried you could houses of parliament. we are told those conversations were resumed have the uk staying in the eu for a today. it's worth noting that one of the things that has come up is this lot longer, causing problems with idea of having a public vote on the budget or appointing the new whatever brexit deal parliament president of the european commission agrees, to see if people actually and the idea brexit last is an issue get behind it. that is something they've perhaps been asking jeremy for a bit longer, we will see corbyn to push why. plenty in his stoplight what would happen with party wanting really press for that elections, with eu elections coming but that will be highly controversial for the prime up elections, with eu elections coming up in may? minister. they will be lots of so, if the uk stays in past the 23rd conservatives are furious at that idea. while talks are still of may, they would almost certainly have to take part in the european happening, but politically there's a lot of difficulty for both parties. parliament elections. but what it interesting you brought up theresa may will presumably be able cross— party it interesting you brought up cross—party talks. we will be to say next week is, well, there is still the option of us not taking talking to rupert hogg, a labour mp pa rt still the option of us not taking part in those elections if later on. she had a meeting with parliament votes for the deal by the theresa may. the boss of boeing has admitted 22nd of may. quite a good incentive software made by the company to vote for the deal if you are the was a factor in the crashes of two of its aircraft.
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prime minister, don't you think? the video statement comes wright thank you. let's pick up on after investigators released results from a preliminary investigation into the crash of an that with alex forsyth. flextension ethiopia airlines flight which killed 157 people. our transport correspondent sounds like a hosepipe extension. tom burridge reports. how will this idea set? adam is just seconds after take—off, and talking about in some ways may be a this ethiopian airlines plane was repeatedly nosediving place towards theresa may's hand, in towards the ground. the crucial week we have got coming the pilots wrestled to pull up, 7 but the automatic anti—stall the crucial week we have got coming the crucial week we have got coming up? it is quite possible. i don't mechanism on the new boeing 737 max think downing street would think this is the worst idea at all. it is 8 was pushing the plane down. something they have suggested before we at boeing are sorry... themselves. at adam as saying, it for the first time, might infact themselves. at adam as saying, it might in fact encourage the more people to get behind theresa may's in a carefully scripted video brexit deal or a version of it rather than have a very long message, the boss of boeing admitted that the aircraft's anti—stall system — known as mcas — extension until next spring. but thatis had erroneously kicked in on this extension until next spring. but that is far from certain. occasion, and on a plane which extension until next spring. but that is farfrom certain. such is the opposition to theresa may's crashed five months earlier off indonesia. brexit deal on her own benches some as pilots have told us, erroneous activation of the mcas function can add to what is already a high workload environment. brexiteers as saying they won't back it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. it and would rather have a long extension and tobacco deal. all the while, the prime minister is talking to labour, jeremy corbyn's team, to
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see if they can come up with some sort of compromise which might be able to get through parliament, because downing street's hope is still that they will be able to get boeing is working to modify the max. a brexit deal through and leave the with hundreds grounded and thousands of orders on ice, the company faces uncomfortable eu before 22nd of may so they don't questions — principally about how this plane was deemed safe to fly. have to take part in those european ralph nader's great—niece was on the ethiopian airlines flight. parliamentary elections. the talks famous for battling and beating big between labour and the government, multinationals over safety, he now i'm told on both sides they are plans to take boeing to court. taking them seriously. they were usually airlines and aircraft productive yesterday, there are manufacturers get away with a quick expected to be more talks today but settlement, a little bit there are still some big political of a public relations problem. my message to boeing is, differences the two sides have to don't think this is going to happen again. resolve so the idea of them reaching a compromise is farfrom certain. for the moment, alex, thank you. this is a damage—limitation exercise. the boss of boeing has admitted boeing's reputation is on the line. software made by the company was a factor in the crashes of two tom burridge, bbc news. of its aircraft. it comes after investigators released preliminary results from an investigation labour has held onto its seat into a ethiopia airlines crash, in the constituency of newport west which killed 157 people. our transport correspondent in a by—election triggered tom burridge reports. by the death of mp paul flynn. just seconds after take—off, ruthjones won with and this ethiopian airlines plane a reduced majority. was repeatedly nosediving the conservatives also lost ground, while ukip tripled its vote towards the ground. the pilots wrestled to pull up, share to 9%.
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tomos morgan reports. but the automatic anti—stall newport west remains mechanism on the new boeing 737 in labour hands. and i hereby declare that the said max—8 was pushing the plane down. ruth lorrainejones is duly elected we at boeing are sorry... as member of parliament now, for the first time, in a carefully scripted video for newport west. message, the boss of boeing admitted after 32 years in the hands of a welsh labour giant, that the aircraft's anti—stall the seat became vacant system — known as mcas — after the death of paul flynn in february. had erroneously kicked in on this occasion, and on a plane this by—election has taken place which crashed five months because of the sad passing earlier off indonesia. of paul flynn, our friend. as pilots have told us, there have been many tributes erroneous activation of the mcas to him over the weeks, function can add to what is already but one thing stood out to me — a high workload environment. everyone knew somebody helped by paul flynn. it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we own it and we know how to do it. these words have been an inspiration to me throughout the campaign. after all, that's what we're here for — boeing is working to modify the max. to do our utmost to help others. newport as a local authority voted with hundreds grounded to leave in the referendum, and thousands of orders on ice, and brexit was a common theme the company faces uncomfortable questions — principally about how on the doorstep. this plane was deemed safe to fly. by—election turnouts are usually lower than general elections. ralph nader's great—niece was 67% voted here two years ago, on the ethiopian airlines flight. famous for battling and beating big but this time around only 37%
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of the constituency came multinationals over safety, out to vote. he now plans to take 11 candidates stood this time, boeing to court. with the conservatives coming in second and ukip third — usually, airlines and aircraft manufacturers get away with a quick settlement, a little bit of a public relations problem. increasing their share of the vote. my message to boeing is, don't think this is going to happen again. this is a damage the man accused of killing 50 people limitation exercise. boeing's reputation is on the line. in last month's terror attacks on two mosques tom burridge, bbc news. in new zealand has been ordered to undergo mental health tests. after brenton tarrant appeared in court via video link, thejudge ruled he would undergo psychiatric assessments to determine labour has held onto its seat if he was fit to stand trial. in newport west, in a by—election he faces 50 murder charges and 39 triggered by the death of mp paul flynn. ruthjones won with a reduced majority for the party. attempted murder charges. the conservatives also lost ground, while ukip tripled its vote one or two alcoholic drinks a day is enough to increase the chances of share to 9%. having a stroke, according to a new turnout was higher than predicted at 37%. study. the man accused of killing 50 people researchers from china in last month's terror attacks and the university of oxford say their findings disprove previous on two mosques in new zealand, claims that light—to—moderate has been ordered to undergo drinking may protect against the condition. mental health tests. it found even a small amount after brenton tarrant appeared of alcohol can raise blood pressure in court via video link, thejudge ruled he would undergo and boost the risk of a stroke psychiatric assessments to determine by as much as 15%. if he was fit to stand trial. if you pay into a work place he faces 50 murder charges and 39
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pension it's going to cost you more from tomorrow. ben is with us. what's happening? attempted murder charges. good morning. this is all part of a man accused of carrying out a that automatic enrolment that began series of knife attacks last weekend in 2012 and this was a government has been charged with five counts of initiative designed to get more of us attempted murder. the attacks in initiative designed to get more of us to save for older age by edmonton in north london began automatically putting us into a saturday night. the 29—year—old will pension scheme whereby an employer pays some money and we pay some appear before magistrates today. money and we save it for a rainy day. the amount we pay in was a now, changes for workplace pensions, proportion of your salary. currently explain what is happening? these are at that rate is 3% that you pay and the auto enrolment ones, not 296 eve ryo ne the auto enrolment ones, not at that rate is 3% that you pay and 2% that your employer would everyone will be on the scheme but this is an employer who contribute. that's a relatively lower rate and what happens now and might have provided a pension in the from tomorrow is that how much you pay will go up. it means that under workplace and you are automatically signed up for it. you can opt out the new system you will pay 5%, your that most have chosen to do it employer will pave 3%. currently, on because it is a decent way of saving for your old age. there is a minimum threshold that you can pay in every an average salary, employer will pave 3%. currently, on an average salary, with the current rate you will pay about £98 per month. at the moment, it is 3%. you month into your pension. under the would contribute 3% and your new scheme, it's about £157. an employer adds another 2%. from tomorrow, those figures are changing. you will pay a little more
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increase of £59, something like that. quite a big difference. some into it. the changes mean you will big changes there and some people pay 5% yourself, of your salary, and will say it's too much too quickly. your employer will add another 3%. but remember that this isn't a it means the cost of that, from your compulsory thing. you can opt out of paycheck every month, will be a bit an automatic enrolment pension. when higher. on average about £60 more they were launched in 2012 there was an assumption that nearly 30% would expensive every month. the minimum? choose to opt out saying they simply yes, you can choose to pay more if couldn't afford it. actually at the you want to. that means that £60 rate is just 8% so it's been a split between you and your employer couldn't afford it. actually at the rate isjust 8% so it's been a much more successful than the government come you don't pay all of that had helped in getting people to save yourself as they make a contribution for old age and tomorrow, when these new wheels come in, it means we will as well as you. auto enrolment has pay a bit more. about £50 extra per been pretty successful as it has encouraged a lot more people to month. start saving for old age who maybe thank you very much. didn't think about it before or don't have a private pension. that the founder of amazon, jeff bays us is about workplaces having their own has reached the biggest divorce pensions to offer to star. the government at the time said if you don't want to do this, you can opt agreement in history. mackenzie bezos will get a stake out but you would be automatically in the company worth more enrolled. you would have to choose than 30 billion dollars. not to do it. they worried a lot of she will have to hand over her voting power people would say, i can't afford in the company to her husband, this right now, i'm not going to who is the world's richest man, sign upfor and give up her interests this right now, i'm not going to sign up for this. actually, they we re in the washington post newspaper sign up for this. actually, they were impressed. they thought about and his space travel 30% would opt out but it has only
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firm, blue origin. it was a star—studded occasion been about 8% was up 9 million are at the natural history museum last night as three members of the royal signed up to these auto enrolment familyjoined sir david attenborough pensions. the cost of it will go up at the premiere of the new netflix a little from tomorrow but remember, series our planet. you get this money back. it's about the prince of wales was there, saving for later in life. you will together with princes william and harry, along with a host contribute a little more. this means of other celebrities including david beckham, you are savings later in life should bea you are savings later in life should who was there with his son brooklyn. be a little more but it will cost the eight part series is narrated you a little extra in your paycheck by sir david and is available on netflix from today. every month. thanks very much. those are the main stories. the mackenzie thanks very much. sport now. wearying english, a story bezos will get a stake in the company worth more than $30 billion. she will have to hand over her voting power about racism in football. we do seem in the company to her husband, who is the world's richest man. she sent out a tweet saying they look forward to their next to be reaching this crescendo phase as co—parents and friends. because we talk about matches being abandoned towards the end. that under 18 is match in ipswich. managers say they will take their players off if there is more suffered by players. now danny rose it was a star studded occasion has basically said the whole at the natural history museum last situation is a farce night, as three members of the royal and not enough is being done. went familyjoined sir david attenborough at the premiere of his countries get fined, he says tongue in cheek, what he spends on an new series our planet.
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average night out in london, it's pathetic and a fight and is enough quite a line—up... to make him want to quit the game. the prince of wales was there, he said in five or six years he'll together with princes william and harry, along with a host walk away. they need people to say of other celebrities including david beckham, who was there with his son brooklyn. they will quit. danny rose has hit the time is 8:10am. we will have the out at the way football authorities are currently dealing with racist abuse. weather shortly, matt is in a he was a victim of it last month whilst playing for england against montenegro in their euro gorgeous place, high up over london. 2020 qualifying match and says he can't wait to see the back everyone knows that binge drinking of football because of it all. isn't good for your health, supasundae shocks aintree on day one but scientists are still split on the long—term effects of the grand national meeting, of alcohol in moderation. beating favourite buveur d'air some studies even suggest that the occasional tipple could help protect you from heart attacks and strokes. in the aintree hurdle. now, a new study of more than 500,000 people has found that and jonny bairstow‘s good form in just a couple of drinks per day the indian premier league continues. could increase the risk after a century last week, of a stroke by as much as 15%. he smashed a quickfire 48 against dehli capitals to help we're joined now by dr iona sunrisers hyderabad millwood, who can tell us a bit to the top of the table. bairstow is the tournament's more about the research. a very good morning to you. good morning stoplight give us a snapshot of what the new research says. our second leading run scorer. study used a genetic approach to look at the effects of alcohol per stroke and heart attack. as you
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leeds' struggles in mentioned before, there has been a the super league continue — as they were on the end of a seven long—term belief that drinking one or two drinks a day could be try trashing to hull kr last night. beneficial for risk of stroke and heart attack. but it has never been they remain near the foot of the table. what in the papers in a clear if this is a real causal effect of alcohol itself or whether moment. it is due to other factors matt has got the weather and he is associated with drinking patterns. in south—east london, some were so our study used a genetic approach rather special. and what we found his drinking good morning. good morning. very good morning to you. a little hidden alcohol increases your blood gem here in south london. shooters pressure and also increases your risk of stroke. we found there is no hill overlooking greenwich. how is protective effect of one or two this for a view? right across. you drinks of day for your risk of can see the reflections of some of stroke. you have done the genetic approach and we will come to that in the skyscrapers across in canary approach and we will come to that in a moment because it's interesting wharf. we are at a grade two listed what you have done. why was it not building here, built in 17 83 by obvious before. we know drinking alcohol raises blood pressure so that would have a connection to lady and james for her husband. stroke, why was that not obvious? what has been done in the past in surrounded by an ancient forest. studies of alcohol have looked at it's hard to spot but worth a visit what people report drinking and then as you can see from the view behind seeing what diseases they get. but me. we will show you my pictures
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from here as we go throughout the they haven't been able to morning. it's a bit chilly here at appropriately control for other this morning. a bit of a breeze but factors, such as underlying poor overall the forecast for many than health in nondrinkers, for example, it has been so far over the last few or association of drinking patterns with other lifestyle factors and days. not feeling quite as chilly. a bit milder and many parts across the social status, and these can influence the results we have seen north and east of the country will be dry. the reason is an area of low in the past. when you have done the pressure that has been with us genetic research, what have you throughout the week. like a big actually done? you examined a washing machine that's wanting to certain group of people? we looked turn off its on its last spin and pushing out to the west. wrapped in chinese men and women. in china around it a weather front bringing and other east asian populations cloud and rain to orkney and there are genetic variants which are wrapping background in towards fairly common in this population south—west england, wales and which affect whether you can northern ireland. these are the areas you are most likely to see tolerate or not tolerate alcohol. i rain today. heavy and persistent for am half chinese myself. i actually one or two of you. could see the ad have one of these key genetic variants, which mean i am intolerant shower elsewhere, particularly across parts of central and southern to alcohol. what does it look like? england, maybe the west midlands. ifi to alcohol. what does it look like? if i have a drink of alcohol, after a couple of sips, a few minutes just an outside chance. for many in later i go bright red, the colour of scotla nd just an outside chance. for many in scotland derry scottish mainland and this so far, and i feel extremely northern england it will be dry and bright with sunshine and uncomfortable. there is no pleasurable effect at all. like an
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temperatures back up. 1a degrees in the best of the sunniest but this allergic reaction? not quite an afternoon. a bit of a south easterly allergic reaction? not quite an allergic reaction? not quite an allergic reaction but it feels breeze, easing a touch as we go similar. it is called the flashing through tonight. the rain at times reaction. what happens is the heavy for wales, south—west england and northern ireland. starting to edge further and further west and metabolism of alcohol isn't working back into the atlantic. more of us properly, because i have one of become dry. clear skies around. these genetic variants. it really puts you off drinking alcohol. i temperatures back into single would say i am an occasional drinker figures, maybe the odd spot of frost ora would say i am an occasional drinker or a nondrinker, ijust but most frost free as we go into would say i am an occasional drinker ora nondrinker, ijust drink would say i am an occasional drinker or a nondrinker, ijust drink very the data that we can. and easterly little because it is really not nice at all. help me a little bit about wind will beat largely with us and it's good to start to drag in cloud to eastern areas as you go through. what people think perhaps anecdotally, which is my grandad had sunshine today in the east, tomorrow two bottles of stout every day for cloudy. could be patchy rain and all his life and he was really well drizzle to the coast late on but the on it. they look at villages in further west you are, western italy, where they look at their diet england, wales, northern ireland, cracking start to we can. blue skies and they way to have a glass of red wine every day. you know the stuff i and feeling present in the sunshine. am talking about, that people think temperatures 1a, maybe 15 celsius —— it hasn't done them any harm. where feeling pleasant in the sunshine. does what you are saying is it with while the air comes back in. best of other things people might either be the sunshine in sheltered western thinking or think they know? what we areas once again. we could see sunshine return to eastern parts as have been able to do using our
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we go into sunday. as we do, and genetic approaches to effectively temperatures shoot up to maybe 16 or conduct a natural experiment, where 17 degrees in one or two we have assigned people into groups south—eastern areas, we could set up based on their genetic variants and one or two heavy showers, that will predict their average particularly for england and wales drinking levels, in a way that is on sunday. it will always feel cooler along the sea coast, given not confounded by other dietary factors, smoking and social class, the winds are coming off five chilly for example. then when we look at north sea. overall, compared to the frequent showers, a bit of these groups of people, classified everything we had in the forecast this week, at the weekend isn't by genetic variance, we see that looking too bad for many. more those with genetic variants that let them drink more also have higher throughout the morning. really does blood pressure and higher risk of look glorious there. thank you, we'll see you later. stroke and there is a sort of continuous response relationship. now what we didn't find in our study let's take a look at today's papers. was clear evidence of a heart the daily mail declares victory in its "war on insurance loyalty rip—offs" — attack. we didn't have enough cases that's when companies put up fees of heart attack to get a clear for customers who don't shop around. the main image is the amazon boss a nswer of heart attack to get a clear answer about the effect of moderate jeff bezos, his wife mackenzie, drinking isa answer about the effect of moderate drinking is a heart attack but for and their record—breaking divorce. stroke we had a lot of cases in our study and we did get clear evidence about stroke. do you know what is interesting? tell me of this is brexit is the lead for true, there are not as many strokes the daily telegraph. it's reporting that ministers have in the uk is in china? that is true, discussed the possibility of giving mps a vote on a further referendum. in china, stroke rates are very
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we have heard today that the eu is high. it confuses me, we now say also going to discuss the possibility of a 12 month extension. drinking two drinks a day can we will talk about that a little increase the risk of stroke? later, perhaps. its main image is a royal tribute drinking one or two a day would to sir david attenborough. the times reports that cabinet increase your risk of stroke, no matter which population you are in ministers are plotting to prevent theresa may from agreeing a year or what the background rates of stroke are, it is a relative risk. long delay to brexit. our results should apply to the uk, and to other populations worldwide, because we were looking at the and the metro enjoys a joke at the expense of mps, effects of alcohol itself, rather reporting a leak that forced than specific genetic variants in the abandonment of proceedings in the commons under the headline: china or specific drinking patterns "what a shower in the house." specific to china. we want to generalise our results to the it forced the deputy speaker to effects of alcohol itself. very dramatically call off proceedings interesting, thank you for your time and send politicians out. the league this morning, doctor. 8:16am is the time. prevents more brexit proposals being let me take you to a lovely castle heard on monday. far, far away. a weird irony on that, isn't there? thank you and good morning! this is you are interested in the mailfront page. this is a story charlie it, seven drew castle, more of a mentioned. insurance loyalty tower, gothic style, built in 1784 rip—offs, essentially the idea that if you don't shop around when your
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term for your contract for your and 87 steps up, here i am on the insurance comes to an end, insurers top with a fantastic panoramic view tend to charge you a lot more and of london. in fact, one of the best they've got a business model that essentially means if you aren't very panoramic views i think you can get savvy and don't shop around they in the city, looking out towards the charge you more. that compensates them for the people that are very river, we have canary wharf behind me and the city as well and 29 miles fickle and move around and get quite a cheap deal. they are saying they away in a very clear day, you are will try to be fair to everyone supposedly able to see windsor across the board, notjust new castle. that's certainly worth a visit when it is open on a sunday to customers. i got an insurance renewal and something i hadn't get one of the best views you can noticed, is that it tells you how probably get here. what a start. the much more expensive it is now than sunshine overhead, after sally it was in the last... it's really disturbed weather in recent days. the weather will quieten down a little bit as we go through today helpful. because people forget. you have so much paperwork and i'vejust and in recent days. still some rain done my house insurance and you look in the west but many places becoming at it and think, what did i pay last drier and brighter and a little less year and how does this compare? chilly. what has been driving the they've had to do that this year and it's changed so it's very clear. but disturbed weather? a big area of low pressure, think of it like a washing still shop around because i had a renewal quote, shut elsewhere and machine, bits of rain, sleet, snow, saved about £300. it's worth doing. hailand machine, bits of rain, sleet, snow, hail and thunder. it is on its last and worth going back to them with bid today before heading into the the new quote and all of a sudden atlantic. still producing some rain they can do you a better deal. that and weather fronts across the
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didn't work for me. i called and country, one from orkney stretching asked for a cheaper one and they took 20 minutes on the foehn, put me back to south—west england, outbreaks of rain in northern on hold and said they'll knock £5 ireland coming and going through the day, some dry and bright moments as off! well. it shouldn't rain all day laughter long. may catch the odd shower elsewhere across england and another racism in football story. a spawning but most places will be dry cup final another racism in football story. a cupfinal in another racism in football story. a cup final in leicestershire was called off after a player was racially abused. the fa looking into away from the south—west and some sunshine developing. the same in mainland scotland and that will make it feel a little milder than it has that. because that united... we of late, temperatures widely into double figures, 13—14 not out of the talked about this last week! they came onto the sofa. was at ipswich? question this afternoon was that this evening and overnight, still rainfora time this evening and overnight, still rain for a time in south—west england, northern ireland and wales. i cloud and patchy rain arrived towards eastern scotland and eastern came onto the sofa. was at ipswich? , players have been threatening and england later in the night but in managers have threatened to take between some clear skies around. it place. it happened in shouldn't be too chilly. on the leicestershire. it's ladies day at fresh side tonight and maybe one or two spots well enough lesson for us aintree. a heroic story of a jacket that most for us free into the start of the weekend because of changes this weekend, low pressure moving coming back after 18 months, after further away. an easterly wind. she broke her back in a fall. she eastern scotland and eastern was back on top of top would come at england, quite cloudy and murky
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around the coast, patchy rain and the horse, and they rolled the drizzle. further west, western fences for the first time at the england and wales, much of northern grand national and won in the fox ireland, a lovely start to weaken, hunters. nothing to do with sport, but a cute blue skies overhead. temperatures around 14—15 and sheltered from the picture. it's the oldest badger, breeze, properly feeling very apparently, that's ever lived in the pleasa nt breeze, properly feeling very pleasant indeed. there will still be uk. found at the side of the road. an easterly breeze into sunday. a 20 years old. how do you know its bit more south—easterly, bringing rain to the far south—east, up to 20? i don't know how you age a 16-17. a rain to the far south—east, up to 16—17. a fair rain to the far south—east, up to 16-17. a fair bit rain to the far south—east, up to 16—17. a fair bit of cloud on badger. it was found at the side of sunday, some sunshine breaking through, the best of the west of the road and has gone to a home for old badges. that's the start of a high pair wales and cumbria but some showers developing across england great joke! you can clarify the body and wales in particular on sunday and wales in particular on sunday was found at the side of the road and the odd everyone possible. temperatures much higher than they but it is alive. 0h, have been of late. that will was found at the side of the road but it is alive. oh, yes, but very thin! it had food and is feeling continue into the start of next week. but a big improvement from what we have seen in the past few better. where do we sit aren't named badges? days. that is how it is looking. this is a lovely picture. sir david attenborough and the launch of his thank you very much, matt. we are on new tv series. what a line—up to the farm today, john maguire is have at your premier! all the looking at raw milk. princes there and only one person when you hear raw milk... it's like there wearing a name badge and it is
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of course david attenborough. milk is not cooked anyway? it is pasteurised, isn't it? we are arguably more recognisable. no! i talking about this. john is in a lovely location in gloucestershire don't think he needs to wear a badge ata dairy lovely location in gloucestershire but i wouldn't say he is more at a dairy farm. good morning. lots of comments have been coming recognisable, really. does it say through, what you make of these? rachel says, and i know you are going to taste it, simply the best david? it says david. 0k. just in milk she has ever tasted. does it taste different? i know this sounds case you won't clear. should we ridiculous but it tastes very, very introduce... it would make life a milky. lots of different types of lot easier. what your nickname?” milky. lots of different types of milk around today! i must admit, at got several, depending where i am. home i drink semi skimmed that this case very milky. yes, really, it is very delicious. show us around and jebel got several, depending where i am. jebel, jackal. you don't want to go there! how are we onlyjust tell us the story. discovering this? i've told charlie sorry, i didn't realise i was carrying on! here we are just before. i think i've heard gerbil outside stroud in gloucestershire, a before. i think i've heard gerbil before it. i try not to use it and couple of very happy cows grazing in the distance was that we are talking now i'm going to try to push it away about this stuff, raw milk, unpasteurised, as you are just again. because i resemble a small saying, directly from the cow in the
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rodent. i'm bringing proceedings to bottle to the customer at this micro a close. it's 6:20am. dairy in stroud. just one of the new businesses, 180 producers at the the milk you put on your cereal moment across england, wales and or in your tea this morning has northern ireland. you are not almost certainly been pasteurised. but more and more people have taken allowed to sell it in scotland. it to drinking "raw" milk. three million litres isa allowed to sell it in scotland. it were sold last year, is a growing business. the question is a growing business. the question but there are concerns is how to make sure it is as safe as over its safety. john maguire is at a dairy possible for people to drink. farm in gloucestershire for us this morning. there we go. he's busy. tell us all. like his father and grandfather before him, jonny crickmore good morning. morning to everyone at is a dairy farmer, but trying to make money from milk these days has never been harder, so at the moment around 40% home. this is a raw, unpasteurised of his production is focused on raw milk, as charlie was saying. different from the milky will put on milk sold directly to the public. your cereals or in your tea and coffee this morning. we are at the it's like the old days when you used stroud micro dairy just to get really good milk at school. coffee this morning. we are at the stroud micro dairyjust outside stroud micro dairyjust outside stroud in gloucestershire. this that flavour is back comes directly from the cows that i with this sort of thing. just ina comes directly from the cows that i you can use it for all types just in a field feet away from where i'm standing. the producer he has of cooking as well. beenin i'm standing. the producer he has been in business for around 2.5 i tried it first in france, yea rs. been in business for around 2.5 years. one of a new breed of raw when i was over there, and the taste milk producers. one of the 180 was phenomenal, so to have somewhere local now is really, really good producers across england, wales and for me so i can get this. northern ireland. part of an the milk we buy normally is pasteurised, heated to destroy
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industry growing hugely. any harmful bacteria it may contain. producing raw milk means hygiene like his father and grandfather standards have to be high. before him, jonny crickmore the thing you do is you want is a dairy farmer, but trying to make money from milk these days to have a visual look at the milk, has never been harder, make sure it's the right colour so at the moment around 40% and there's nothing, of his production is focused on raw no infection in the cows' quarter. secondly, you would use this surgery milk sold directly to the public. sort of disinfectant, that goes on the cow's teat and then it's like the old days when you used you go over it afterwards with this to get really good milk at school. wood wool and that will get the teat that flavour is back with this sort of thing. as clean as you could possibly get you can use it for all types it before you put the unit on. of cooking as well. the past five years i tried it first in france have seen an explosion in the demand for raw milk — when i was over there and the taste was phenomenal so to have somewhat a fivefold increase from around 600,000 litres in 2012 to more local now is really, really good for me so i can get this. than three million last year. the milk we buy normally is pasteurised, heated to destroy in england, wales and northern any harmful bacteria it may contain. ireland, raw drinking milk can only producing raw milk means hygiene be bought by consumers directly from the dairy farmers — standards have to be high. so no supermarkets, for example — the thing you do is you want and in scotland it's banned from sale. to have a visual look at the milk, now, the food standards agency make sure it's the right colour is undergoing a consultation looking and there's nothing, at how the burgeoning industry no infection in the cows' quarter. should be controlled. secondly you would use this surgery sort of disinfectant, that goes on the cow's teat and then there is no reason why we shouldn't. you go over it afterwards with this if we go about the next few years
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wood wool and that will get the teat and prove that we can confidently as clean as you could possibly get sell raw milk and it can be sold it before you put the unit on. anywhere in the uk safe, the past five years have seen we shouldn't be able an explosion in the demand for raw to allow coffee shops or, milk — a fivefold increase like you say, retailers to sell raw from around 600,000 litres in 2012 to more than 3 million last year. milk alongside other milks, but the great thing about it is it gives the farmer the chance in england, wales and northern to sell his products ireland, raw drinking milk can only be bought by consumers directly to the public again. at the fsa headquarters from the dairy farmers, dr kevin hargin points out the increase in the number so no supermarkets, for example — and in scotland it's banned from sale. of producers up to around 180. now the food standards agency it is, though, treated is undergoing a consultation looking at how the burgeoning industry as a risky product. between 2015 and 2017, should be controlled. there were five outbreaks related to raw drinking milk involving over 100 people and many of them there is no reason why we shouldn't. were children, and we had quite if we go about the next a few hospitalisations from those two years and prove that we can confidently sell raw outbreaks as well, milk and it can be sold so it is a risky product. anywhere in the uk safe, we shouldn't be able to allow coffee shops or, like you say, direct farm sales mean raw drinking retailers to sell raw milk alongside other milks, milk is measured not in food but the great thing about it is it
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gives the farmer the chance to sell his products miles but in food feet, to the public again. but its being allowed to travel at the fsa headquarters further afield to shops dr kevin hargin points out and larger retailers remains the increase in the number a fair distance away. of producers up to around 180. have you ever seen have you ever seen in outdoor it is though treated milking parlour before? i must as a risky product. between 2015 and 2017 admit, i haven't but that is what we there were five outbreaks related to raw drinking milk involving over have set up at the stroud micro 100 people and many of them dairy. we arejoined by were children, and we had quite have set up at the stroud micro dairy. we are joined by the farm here, good morning is that we are talking about this consultation a few hospitalisations from those process which is being undertaken by outbreaks as well, the food standards agency at the moment. what would you like to see so it is a risky product. is the outcome of it? i think as an direct farm sales mean raw drinking industry, we are growing. my members milk is measured not in food have trust and love for my milk. i miles but in food feet, wa nt but its being allowed to travel have trust and love for my milk. i want to work in an industry where further afield to shops that trust and insurance is and larger retailers remains a fair distance away. wholesale. i think with the raw milk producers and fca working together a few short steps into the clean and us improving our standards and
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area to meet the derry format here whatnot, we can get there and people —— micro dairy farmer here. watch can see raw milk something natural, safe, delicious and something that out for the plastic curtains. good they've tasted before. you are morning. good morning. it's a bit called a micro dairy for a very good early for milk so we are prepping reason, you are small scale. a lot of the businesses are fairly small this. its fermented milk drink for scale. i wonder if there is a danger, if it's too successful, it your tummy. we are talking about might get too big and some of the great qualities associated with it might be lost, could that happen?” co nsulta nt your tummy. we are talking about consultant and stressing the fact think there's less of a chance of it that the industry is growing hugely. what do you want from this happening now that we have a band of people together that want to grow with this industry as peers, to consultation consultation and what do you think the fsa will say? more figure out how we are going to best than what they will say at the end, keep what we've got and how well it what i want is for us to kind of work together. as the raw milk is working on how delicious the milk is working on how delicious the milk is and make sure once raw milk is producers association and the fsa, available in every town, that the together. we have a quality product experience still holds true. right, that we are delighted with. we can thank you very much indeed. i will a lwa ys that we are delighted with. we can let you carry on with your always improve it. and if we can bring that extra assurance to the preparations. as we saw in the film wider population that this is a from the farm in suffolk, there is a
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healthy and safe milk to drink, then lot that goes into making sure that the farm is as clean as possible, to all the better. thank you very much indeed. we'll meet some of your make sure none or as few as possible lovely... you have about ten cows. pathogens get into the milk. so, we'll meet them later and we will milking just starts now. he only has see an outdoor milking parlour which isa see an outdoor milking parlour which is a first for me. i'm going to hand 10-12 milking just starts now. he only has 10—12 milking cows here at the due to our regional news teams across the uk. i'll leave you with dairy, so are fairly small—scale is that we have spoken to a couple of this lovely logo that they put on customers who have been coming and the back of the bottle is here that going this morning. they really do pretty much tells you their story. talk to you later. enjoy the taste, and also there is a lot of talk about some of the perceived health benefits of raw good morning from bbc london milk as well. so watch this space. it is an industry that is very much news, i'm sonja jessup. growing. we will have to see what a man accused of carrying out a happens and how large the industry series of knife attacks in edmonton can grow in the months and the years in north london has been charged to come. back to you. it's an with five counts of attempted murder. four people were stabbed on saturday interesting one to talk about. we night, and a fifth on tuesday. have had more comments, ali said she jason kakaire, who's 29, grew up have had more comments, ali said she grew up on a have had more comments, ali said she grew up on a dairy farm and drank raw milk as a child. i suppose it is is due before magistrates later. getting used to something when we have had supermarket milk for so a london paddle boarder who gave up long. i suppose the key thing is, herjob to fight plastic pollution is calling on the public to help it's about the fact you can't
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tackle the problem. guarantee it is 100% safe. lots of lizzie carr set up the app plastic patrol — people, rightly or wrongly, users photograph and tag the location of plastic waste guarantee it is 100% safe. lots of people, rightly orwrongly, look for to reveal where the hotspots are. that in modern life. but there are it's already helped identify nearly other foods that have an associated 200 tonnes of rubbish — equivalent to the weight risk with them, packed salad, of 15 million water bottles. we've logged 80,000 examples of plastic pollution in an app, shellfish, sushi, raw chicken, a lot which has helped us of people... a lot of people work understand what the problem looks with raw chicken every single day. like all over the world and gather soi really important data so that we can with raw chicken every single day. so i suppose just getting used to working out, it works for some put accountability back in the hands of those responsible. people but not for others. john, so i think individual actions, you know, they good to talk to, see you later. all add up. 8:26am. time for the news, weather and travel where you are. take a look at this. an unassuming red brick building next to a pub and st james's park tube station. but it's just been revealed it used to be the home to intelligence officers for 66 years. hi, there. the secret can only be shared today good morning. because they've moved out. although apparently neighbours say it was common the weather's been quite unsettled knowledge among the locals. over the past few days. let's ta ke let's take a look at the travel... we've had an area of low pressure moving its way through over the uk. it's all running well on the cheap. you can see it quite nicely on the satellite imagery there were some problems on the from the last few days.
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district line a moment ago but that the swirl of cloud just advancing its way further west. just appear to have cleared up. you can still see it here this morning. this weather front just southern and gatwick express trains still wrapped around it, from victoria to clapham junction i that's going to bring bring some cloud and outbreaks of rain across the far north of scotland today and near the centre disrupted. let's look at the m25. of low pressure is where we will have most of the showers. traffic is crawling. a reminder of it's around northern ireland, through wales, through the south—west of england that'll see the majority of the showers today. roadworks in islington, highbury corner is closed stop and in hill the further east you are, it is going to stay largely dry there is works on london road at the and they will be some sunshine. maximum temperatures up to about 12—14 degrees. junction with sid and hill. let's with the south—easterly get the weather. hello, good morning. wind will make it feel if you've been feeling the chill over the last couple of days or so, warmer you will be pleased to note that than it has on recent days. today is looking warmer. through tonight those showers continue to edge their way further it should also stay dry westwards, improving and there'll be plenty the situation here. tonight we will see quite a bit of sunshine around at times. but it's a bit of a cloudy of cloud moving in and fog. start to the day. in the east. it's milder out there temperatures down to 3—6 degrees, than it was this time yesterday. perhaps a touch of frost over a lot of that cloud is set higher ground in scotland to clear its way westwards through the night. over the weekend, it as we head through the morning, will be quite cloudy, but always more cloud that south—easterly wind, the further west you are. some sunshine, the best in the west, the best of the brightness and there will be some and the sunshine today will tend showers during sunday. to be towards eastern areas.
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staying dry, bit of a south—easterly so this is saturday. breeze going on, but it's that wind because the cloud is coming that's dragging up the milder air from the east it could bring some from the near continent. showers and drizzle down we'll see highs today between 11, the eastern coasts. a lot of cloud towards maybe as high as 13 or 1a celsius. central and eastern parts. now, through this evening and overnight, there'll be the further west you are, you will more cloud developing. clear skies at first and cloud see the best of the sunshine. pushes in from the east the temperatures will struggle but it should stay dry. overnight lows between 4 across eastern areas and 5 but turning milder but towards the west they will be up into tomorrow morning. to about 11—13 degrees. now, over the weekend we've got an easterly wind, by sunday, the risk of some showers so always cooler towards eastern again moving in across the east. areas but highs of 1a degrees. some heavy, perhaps dry on saturday, warmer thundery showers developing in the south—east of england. still on sunday, but with the chance of some afternoon showers. the further west you are it will be drier and brighter. temperatures, however, they will be getting up to about a 16—17 degrees in the south—east. but again, always quite chilly along that's all for now. those north sea coasts. that's all from me. you can hear more from us in around bye— bye. half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time now is coming up to 6:30am.
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it's bigger than the music and movie industries combined. but gaming companies are being urged to take more of a social responsibility. we'll speak to one former games addict. scientists are split on how harmful moderate drinking can be for you, with some suggesting a little tipple can actually protect against strokes. but that advice is being dismissed this morning. we'll tell you why a little later. fleabag tells the story of a young woman navigating the messy business that is modern life. one of the stars, sian clifford, will be here to talk about what's been one of the the big comedy hits of the year. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the european council president donald tusk could offer the uk a flexible brexit extension of one year according to senior eu officials.
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under the plan, to be put to eu leaders at a special summit next week, britain would have the option of leaving earlier, if parliament ratified a deal. meanwhile, the attorney general geoffrey cox has said there's likely to be a lengthy brexit delay if cross—party talks with jeremy corbyn don't succeed. the boss of boeing has admitted that a failure the boss of boeing has admitted that afailure in the boss of boeing has admitted that a failure in the aircraft's anti—stall a failure in the aircraft's a nti —stall system a failure in the aircraft's anti—stall system was up factor in the crash of two of its planes. chief executive dennis muilenburg made the statement promising to fix the fault after a preliminary report into the crash found the pilots "repeatedly" followed procedures recommended by boeing before the crash. pilots have told us erroneous activation of the ncas function can add to what is already a high workload environment. it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we own it and we know how to do it. the man accused of killing 50 people in last month's terror attacks on two mosques in new zealand has been ordered to undergo mental health tests. after brenton tarrant appeared in court via video link, thejudge ruled he would undergo psychiatric assessments to determine if he was fit to stand trial.
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he faces 50 murder charges and 39 attempted murder charges. a man accused of carrying out a series of knife attacks last weekend has been charged with five counts of attempted murder. the attacks began in edmonton in london on saturday night. one or two alcoholic drinks a day is enough to increase the chance of having a stroke. researchers from china and the university of oxford say their findings disprove previous claims that light to moderate drinking may protect against the condition. the founder of amazon, jeff bezos, has reached the largest divorce settle m e nt has reached the largest divorce settlement in history with his former wife. mackenzie bezos will get a stake in the company worth more than 30 billion dollars. she will have to hand over her voting power in the company to her husband, who is the world's richest man.
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she sent out a tweet saying they look forward to their next phase as co—parents and friends. britain's spy agency, gchq, is supposed to be home to one you might think of secret corridors and rooms full of high—tech gadgets. but our revelation to date paints a very different picture. a plain red brick building, next to a pub and a tube station in central london, was home to intelligence officers for 66 years. the secret can only be revealed today because they've moved out. gchq gathers communications from around the world to identify and disrupt threats to the uk. its main site is in cheltenham but it's keeping a base in london too. look for another kind of boring building, i imagine, if you want to find out where it is. i'm sure that street used to be where the passport office was in london, there was a building like that. somebody out
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there will know, palmer street, wasn't it? perhaps i thought i was going into the passport office but i wasn't really. as spy, it's only just coming out now. the shoes are quite annoying, they are now done up, the laces. time for the sport. you used the word weary earlier and it has become weary sum, the fact we are talking about this so much, race, and teams are now walking off the pitch. we saw in leicestershire a team walking off because one of the players received racist abuse and one of the main england players is saying it makes him want to quit the game because of the paltry punishments being handed out to clubs whose fans are guilty of
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racist abuse. when he says they are fine, as he puts it, as little as he spends on a night out in london. rose was a victim of racist chanting during england's euro 2020 win over montenegro just last month, and has told the bbc he can't wait to see the back of football, because of this.. at the minute how i programme myself now, i just think that i've got five or six more years left in football and i just can't wait to see the back of it. seeing how things are done in the game at the minute, i just want to enjoy football as much as i can and there's so many politics and yeah, i just can't wait to see the back of it, to be honest.
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england's danny rose speaking to the bbc. england's women play a world cup warm—up against canada tonight and manager phil neville hopes he'd be brave enough to take his players off the field if he heard any racist abuse. we cannot no longer keep sweeping things under the carpet with a £10,000, £20,000 fine, half a stadium, because i'm not sure we're getting to the bottom of the real issue. i think if we have the courage and we have the backing, more importantly, to maybe bring the team off, to stop the game, say, "right, this is not good enough, we're going to punish the supporters that are causing the problems", then i think, i hope, i would have the courage to do that. away from that story to a surprise win on the first day of the aintree festival. the two—time cheltenham champion hurdle winner and favourite, buveur d'air, was beaten in the aintree hurdle by supasundae, who's trained byjessica harrington and ridden by robbie power. the main event on saturday is, of course, the grand national. the a0 runners have been confirmed including last year's winner tiger roll, who's the favourite.
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jonny bairstow‘s good form in the indian premier league has continued. after a century last week, he smashed a quickfire 48 against dehli capitals to help the sunrisers hyderabad to the top of the table. bairstow is the second leading run scorer in the competition. what has happened to leeds rhinos? they remain stuck to the bottom of the super league table after another defeat to hull kr. the eight super league winners conceded seven tries — including this in the last play of the game from ben crooks — as they lost 45—26. hull kr move up to seventh in the table. raheem sterling will have his own fan club cheering him on as manchester city take on brighton in the fa cup semifinal this weekend. the england forward and his club have arranged for 550 students from his old school, the ark elvin academy in london, to be at wembley on saturday. ticket and transport costs are being provided for the pupils to get to and from the match.
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what a day they will have, i'm sure they will get to see raheem sterling may be after the game and cheer him on. that's fantastic, doing our bit for your own school. what about fans of the team ? for your own school. what about fans of the team? i think they will cheer him on whatever happens. the boss of boeing has admitted, for the first time, that a failure in the aircraft's anti—stall system was a factor in the crash of an ethiopia airflight, which killed 157 people. we're joined now by former pilot and chief executive of the uk flight safety committee, dai whittingham. good morning and thank you for your time. i wonder if you could do a translation for us who don't know the aviation industry the way you do, this statement from bowen, i will read it out and you can translate for me. "it's apparent that on both liked the manoeuvring
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characteristics augmented system acted in response to an erroneous angle of attack information.". the angle of attack information.". the angle of attack refers to the angle between the wing and arriving at it, more angle, more left, but if you have too much angle the airflow brea ks have too much angle the airflow breaks away from the wing and you lose left, it's called a stall, so that ncas was a certification requirement that refers to the forces pilots a re requirement that refers to the forces pilots are experiencing so if you imagine driving a car you want to go around the corner and you have to go around the corner and you have to put force to the wheel and if thatis to put force to the wheel and if that is a constant radius turn it's a co nsta nt that is a constant radius turn it's a constant force, but if the turn winds up and you want more input, you want the forces on the wheel to be higher and i understand that in the development phase of displaying those forces were found to be
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reducing so this system was designed to provide a constant gradient on the slip forces. what has the boeing statement told us that we didn't know? this statement has told us that the mcas has been directly implicated in two fatal accidents early on in the service life of this plane so they know it was the failure within that system that precipitated those accidents, that is serious and that's why the aircraft are grounded, they will not fly again until boeing and the regulator, in the states the federal aviation administration and i suspect a number of other regulators across the world will be looking for absolute assurance that system is fixed. for some people this goes to the heart of what they think of when
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they fly, essentially a lot of people think ultimately in the worst of all scenarios the pilot is in control and he has control of the plane and what he or she does is the thing that happens, and we know there's a lot of information that's coming to them, a lot of computers are used in the flight system but explain that for me, how is it that pilots were not able to control the plane without other things having a bearing on it? if we go back to the car analogy, if your car is polling left when you try to go in a straight line, the tracking is out, you adjusted and the car goes in a straight line sodastream system is there to balance the forces on the aircraft in the same way so when you let go of the controls it goes the way you pointed it. with this mcas system it acts by putting in a large
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nose down movement, i think it's a movement that the original designers would not have had at such a great level and it seems that the amount of control deflection that has gone in has been beyond the physical capabilities of pilots to manage, it ma nifests capabilities of pilots to manage, it manifests as a force on the stick that you need to pull against. there isa that you need to pull against. there is a manual back—up for it but that is a manual back—up for it but that isa is a manual back—up for it but that is a wheel that sits almost at the lower level so if you're trying to wind upfairly lower level so if you're trying to wind up fairly stiff handle in a circular motion with something that is down by your left or right shin, that his hard work and it appears this may be at the root of why they ended up with such high forces on the stick that they couldn't deal with it, but you're right, people have every reason to expect the pilots are in full control and that's one of the issues that boeing
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and the faa will try to deal with is that that situation does not happen again. dai whittingham, thank you for your time, chief executive of the uk flight safety committee. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. i used to live in the part of london where you are now and i don't have a scooby as to places you are at. many people said the same to me, we are in south london's hidden gems, on shooters hill overlooking greenwich, a pretty unusual castle, 18th century gothic which is triangular—shaped, almost a tower, 87 steps up and we have a view like this. we are 432 feet above sea level, probably the best view of
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london you will ever get down towards ca nary wharf, london you will ever get down towards canary wharf, towards the city and the shard, it is a stunning place to visit and worth seeking out if you want a good view especially when the sun is out and it will be out this weekend, coming up behind us out this weekend, coming up behind us it's looking a lot better, for many, then the last few days, starting to feel a little less cold, still a chilly breeze this morning, but it will become a bit drier especially northern and eastern areas. the area of low pressure, think of it as a washing machine on its last spin, it is pushing its way up its last spin, it is pushing its way up to the north atlantic, behind it isa up to the north atlantic, behind it is a weather front which is moving back into south west wales and northern ireland, there will be some drier moments but when it does rain
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it could be heavy, away from that you can rule out the odd shower across southern england and the midlands but much of north and eastern england and much of scotland will be dry with sunny spells and temperatures are above where they have been in recent days. this evening and overnight rain for parts of south—west england and wales and northern ireland, heavy at times but it will ease off later towards the west and we will bring in more cloud but even though we have some clear spells, temperatures should stay up for many but cannot rule out the odd touch of frost on saturday morning. this weekend we have easterly winds, the low pressure system has moved far enough away to keep most places dry but we could see showers for eastern england and scotland but for wales and northern ireland, lots of
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sunshine on saturday, could see temperatures are around 1a or 15, just a chance of rain later on in the channel islands and cornwall and on sunday still showers possible but many places will stay dry, more sunshine across eastern areas, the best sunshine on sunday out towards sheltered parts of wales and northern ireland and cumbria, temperatures could get to 17 degrees towards the south—east corner, a big improvement on the wintry conditions some of you experienced in the past few days. that said, back to naga and charlie. behind you on the fence, what are those names on the little plaques on the balustrades? these bits here? they tell me the distances, that one
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says the shard, seven miles away, so that gives you an idea what you are looking for. so that's where you will see the name? yes, so you have a good view, you can work out for yourself where you can work out for yourself where you are. thank you, matt. ben is going to talk to us about pay gaps in the workplace. it's the time of year where firms have to report the pay gap between men and women, a lot of firms didn't comply and they are now in line for a fine. these are the latest figures that will have upset any organisation that has more than 250 staff.
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the deadline was midnight last night andi the deadline was midnight last night and i found the deadline was midnight last night and ifound on average men are the deadline was midnight last night and i found on average men are still paid 9.6% more than women on average. the worst sector was construction so we spoke to chloe cooper, who works in construction and says things are changing for the better. it comes down to the number of females in construction which is creating the gap and the amount of women who have historically come into the business being able to move into the business being able to move into senior roles creates a gap there so the more women are attracted into the industry, the sooner attracted into the industry, the sooner that will change. when i joined their work for women on my course, one of whom got employed at the time and now i can see a huge difference, 50% of our graduates are female so that influx of women is definitely happening. let's talk
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about everywhere else. with me is some smothers, chief executive of the dorset society, which campaigns for women's rights. so much work has been done on this. the gender pay gap isa been done on this. the gender pay gap is a complex issue and takes time to close and we are seeing employers beginning to engage with what they have to do but not really getting to grips with action plans so we are getting to grips with action plans so we are not surprised it's getting worse before it gets better and sometimes if you get women in to the pipeline at the beginning that can make the pipe gap bigger rather than smaller initially. paying women less than men for the same work is illegal, but how do we make this better? we need action plans to be mandatory and we need to hold firms to account with proper penalties if they don't address these pay gaps
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but we also have to address the impact of flexibility across all rules so women impact of flexibility across all rules so women can progress, impact of flexibility across all rules so women can progress, the construction industry is a good example, there are very few women in it and pay discrimination is a real thing, we run an advice service and we know it's still happening, women don't get transparency and find out what their colleagues are earning and without that you cannot challenge it. it's also about flexibility because women might bring up children and that is detrimental to their pay prospects later. how do you resolve that? one fundamental that could change is the quality of part—time work, if you come back from maternity leave you might want to work part time but there are few well—paid jobs available and women get trapped in part—time work.
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available and women get trapped in part-time work. and it's that work that tends to be less paid, women tend to do more of it. let's talk about success stories because some firms are doing well, even though the headline doesn't suggest they are. what are they doing right? some of the firms that are doing well have been starting earlier so they have been starting earlier so they have been starting earlier so they have been getting to grips with this problem from further back, they know it's a long term game and you need a five year plan so if companies engage properly with the problem and try to address it consistently they will see results but it will take time. it's nice to see you, thank you so much for explaining that sam smethers from the fawcett society, things are starting to change but more work still to do.
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may i ask you and your guest a simplistic question, which is that ifan simplistic question, which is that if an employer is breaking the law once they know there is a pay disparity, how is that not action? the individual can challenge it but it's down to the woman to bring discrimination claims, she can bring out claim if she has the information but it's difficult to challenge, claims go on for years, and action in glasgow took 12 years to respond. is it easy for companies to deny a gender pay gap? lots of cases go through and they say this is just a readjustment and that's how they get away with it. it is, at the moment the employer still holds all the cards, they have the paid data and the individual doesn't have that pay
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data available to her so we still have an imbalance of power but there is more transparency, it's getting employers to look at their pay systems but it will take more work to close it and we still have to deal with pay discrimination. to close it and we still have to dealwith pay discrimination. really interesting. sorry, ben, next time we do an interview you come and do a couple of questions at the end. today is the start of the bbc‘s dance passion festival, a nationwide celebration of the uk's dance scene. a teacher in sheffield has come up with a technique to help make it more accessible to people who've lost some or all of their sight. david sillito's been to meet him. sweeping his arms through the air, dipping and sweeping across the space with balletic movement... what you are hearing is audio description, a way of bringing dance to people with visual impairment. but it has its limitations, especially with street dance.
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known as breaking or b—boying, it's just too fast for words. the dancer stamps his legs from left to right and then swings his arms up and down... you're defeated. it's too tricky. so nathan here has come up with a new way of turning dance into sound. whp, whp, whp, whp, whp! zzzzhoom! how does it help? it creates a richer soundscape for people with visual impairment. zzzzzh. . . vwom, vwom, vwom, vwom, vwom! zzzzhoom! conventional audio description is pretty much done — "the dancer lifts her arm, moves it to the side, they turn their head to the left" and that's pretty much it. with the sound effects that we use, we can audio describe a complex area of movement in a very short space of time. i saw one movement, it was sort of like this. does that have a sound?
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and it's a language that's fairly quick to pick up. whoosh, whoosh! i think i get that. you know immediately what you're looking at, don't you? yes. and the sounds don'tjust help the audience follow the movements. it's also a tool in the dance studio, a place that is for this group a haven. for me as a visually impaired person, i walk with a cane and people don't always recognise that in london so there's kind of collisions, there is miscommunication. there is a freedom, then, in the dance studio. oh, yes, definitely, the dance studio is an open space, i know where i am. i know the size of the space. i walk the space prior to moving in it, and it's that familiarity that really helps. and it's notjust the freedom — it's also a work—out for a non—visual sense of space and other people.
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you can feel where people are? ican sense. so if i walk around you, you would know where i am. i would know... i would know. drop to one knee, soar through the air. audio description for dance has completely revolutionised dance for visually impaired audiences. it's brought people in and it's allowed people who had a late—onset sight loss to re—engage with theatre, re—engage with dance. whoosh, brrr, gzhoom! so even if you're never going to quite manage this, this new language of dance may at least help you appreciate those who can. very impressive moves. time now to get the news, travel and weather where
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you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a man has been charged with the murder of a shopkeeper in north west london. ravi katharkamar was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened up his newsagents in pinner. 31—year—old alex gunn will appear in court later today. a london paddleboarder who gave up herjob to fight plastic pollution is calling on the public to help tackle the problem. lizzie carr set up the app plastic patrol — users photograph and tag the location of plastic waste to reveal where the hotspots are. it's already helped identify nearly 200 tonnes of rubbish — equivalent to the weight of 15 million water bottles. we've logged 80,000 examples of plastic pollution in an app, which has helped us understand what the problem looks like all over the world and gather really important data so that we can put accountability back in the hands of those responsible. so i think individual actions, you know, they all add up. a new online platform is being launched to help identify
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whether homeless people have been reported as missing. they will ask if they want to let theirfamily they will ask if they want to let their family members know they are safe and would like to be reunited. it's being backed by the mayor, who's given the project £62,000. the queen elizabeth olympic park celebrates its fifth birthday today. a celebration's being held to mark the anniversary of the venue in stratford being transformed and re—opened to the public following the 2012 games. since then it's thought around 27 million people have visited. on to the travel now. on the tube, it's all running well, but this is how the m25 looks, traffic barely moving from junction 24 tojunction
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traffic barely moving from junction 24 to junction 23 and the a40 is still moving slowly after an accident. time for a look at the weather. hello, good morning. if you've been feeling the chill over the last couple of days or so, you will be pleased to know that today is looking warmer. it should also stay dry and there'll be plenty of sunshine around at times. but it's a bit of a cloudy start to the day. it's milder out there than it was this time yesterday. a lot of that cloud is set to clear its way westwards as we head through the morning, but always more cloud the further west you are. the best of the brightness and the sunshine today will tend to be towards eastern areas. staying dry, bit of a south—easterly breeze going on, but it's that wind that's dragging up the milder air from the near continent. we'll see highs today between 11, maybe as high as 13 or 14 celsius. now, through this evening and overnight, there'll be more cloud developing. clear skies at first and cloud pushes in from the east but it should stay dry. overnight lows between 4 and 5 but turning milder into tomorrow morning. now, over the weekend we've got an easterly wind, so always cooler towards eastern areas but highs of 14 degrees.
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dry on saturday, warmer still on sunday, but with the chance of some afternoon showers. that's all for now. you can hear more from us in around half an you can hear more from us in around halfan arc you can hear more from us in around half an arc and there is plenty more on the website. goodbye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a12 a 12 month extension to brexit. reports of a new offer being put together by the president of the european council. the head of boeing accepts for the first time that crucial software is linked to the fatal crashes of two of its aircraft. it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we own it and we know how to do it. saving more for old age. if you pay into a work place
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pension it's going to cost you more from tomorrow. i'll look at how much it could cost you. can't wait to quit the game. england defender danny rose says racist abuse means he's had enough of football. we're talking raw, unpasteurised milk this morning from these ladies direct to the bottle. it's becoming increasingly popular. how best to make it as safe as for people to drink? and i have some better weather news for you today. after the showers, more are becoming drier, less cold and that continues into the weekend. join me from this hidden gem overlooking london in the next 15 minutes. good morning friday the 5th of april. the european council president donald tusk is proposing to offer the uk a flexible brexit extension of one year, according to its senior eu official. talks between labour and the
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government are set to continue today to try to end the parliamentary deadlock. britain is due to leave the eu a week today. as yet, no withdrawal deal has been approved by mps. ina withdrawal deal has been approved by mps. in a moment we will talk to our political correspondent in westminster but first let's talk to our brussels reporter, adam fleming. good morning. a bit of a surprise. i know it's got to be put to the other eu leaders but we didn't see this coming. for people watching closely, it's not a massive surprise because donald tusk, the president of the european council, has always been in favour of an extension. this is up to the longer end to give the uk the maximum amount of time and space to work out what it wants to do, whether that is get this deal through, change the deal to a different kind of brexit, have a referendum, stay in, change the government, have an election. he wa nts to government, have an election. he wants to have maximum space available and it's worth remembering what donald tusk is's job is. in the
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run—up to summits like the one we'll have in brussels next wednesday, he speaks to all the leaders in person or on the phone, try to find a consensus position to unite everyone but then he puts it on the table and the ultimate decision is down to the leaders. the plan can change quite significantly once those prime ministers and presidents and chancellors get into the room and get their hands on the document. of course it has to be signed up to by the uk. the last time an extension was discussed at a summit in march, the idea initially was that theresa may would come with a flexible offer, a maximum end date for extension but with the idea the uk could get out sooner if it passed the deal. this sounds very similar to the idea that they were discussing right at the start of this whole process. i'm glad you've been watching closely and explained all of that! thank you. let's go to alex in westminster. it's flexible brexit,
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is that what's going on —— flexibrexi? the brexit dragon gets better and better. we understand that this morning they will set up their position when it comes to the way forward. it is worth saying this. if indeed the eu does say you can stay in for a long time but if you get a deal through you can leave earlier, that might help number 10 because they are still trying to get a deal through parliament and that might focus the mind of some people that would rather back a brexit deal than face a really long delay to this process. i'm not sure they would be entirely opposed to it but we are waiting to see exactly what they say. meantime, we have the conversation is expected to carry on today between the government and members of the labour party, senior labourfigures, to members of the labour party, senior labour figures, to see members of the labour party, senior labourfigures, to see if members of the labour party, senior labour figures, to see if they can come up with some sort of compromise, which they can put forward together and get through parliament. it's worth saying when it comes to the policy, there is a
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lot they agree on but there are some contentious issues. whether we should stay closely tied to the eu ina should stay closely tied to the eu in a customs union, whether they should be a separate vote for the public on all of this, and labour and the conservatives, the leaders are coming under pressure from their own parties. still quite a long way to go when it comes to that. over the rest of the day and their weekend we will see those conversations continue before theresa may goes out to brussels next week, when we hope, we hope we might get more clarity. thank you very much. what was the term? flexibrexi. i'm not saying it should be officially adopted because it sounds slightly absurd. but some things are, aren't they? the boss of boeing has admitted software made by the company was a factor in the crashes of two of its aircraft. the video statement comes after investigators released results from a preliminary investigation into the crash of an ethiopia airlines flight which killed 157 people. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports.
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just seconds after take—off, and this ethiopian airlines plane was repeatedly nosediving towards the ground. the pilots wrestled to pull up, but the automatic anti—stall mechanism on the new boeing 737 max eight was pushing the plane down. we at boeing are sorry... now, for the first time, in a carefully scripted video message, the boss of boeing admitted that the aircraft's anti—stall system — known as mcas — had erroneously kicked in on this occasion, and on a plane which crashed five months earlier off indonesia. as pilots have told us, erroneous activation of the mcas function can add to what is already a high workload environment. it's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we own it and we know how to do it. boeing is working to modify the max. with hundreds grounded and thousands of orders on ice, the company faces uncomfortable questions — principally about how this plane was deemed safe to fly.
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ralph nader's great—niece was on the ethiopian airlines flight. famous for battling and beating big multinationals over safety, he now plans to take boeing to court. usually airlines and aircraft manufacturers get away with a quick settlement, a little bit of a public relations problem. my message to boeing is, don't think this is going to happen again. this is a damage—limitation exercise. boeing's reputation is on the line. tom burridge, bbc news. the man accused of killing 50 people in last month's terror attacks on two mosques in new zealand has been ordered to undergo mental health tests. after brenton tarrant appeared in court via video link, thejudge ruled he would undergo psychiatric assessments to determine if he was fit to stand trial. he faces 50 murder charges and 39 attempted murder charges. if you pay into a work place pension
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— it's going to cost you more from tomorrow. this is part of auto enrolment, a government scheme to get more of us to say for old age. it began in 2012, nine million people or so have signed up. it is voluntary but the idea is that you automatically get added and you have to opt out if you don't want it. at the moment you as an individual pay about 3% of your salary into it and your employer will stop that up with 2%. from tomorrow that will change. you will pay 5% in and your employer will pay 396. pay 5% in and your employer will pay 3%. on average it will cost the average person earning an average amount of money about £60 more per month. it's a split between you and your employer. you will pay about half each. it means the amount of money you pay into your pension, saving for old age, is going up. this is all about the idea that not enough of us are saving enough for when we retire. they want to get
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more people involved. this scheme applies to anyone aged 22—61 if you are earning over £10,000. you will pay a bit more. on average £60 extra per month. your contributions are going up. the government was worried a lot of people would opt out of this scheme because they might say, look, i can't avoid it. but they've been really surprised at how successful it's been. they thought about 30% of people would choose not to ta ke about 30% of people would choose not to take part. since 2012 it's just 8%. more of us saving for old age and from tomorrow it will cost a little bit more. thank you very much. one or two alcoholic drinks a day is enough to increase the chances of having a stroke by as much as 15% according to a new study. researchers from china and the university of oxford say their findings disprove previous claims that light to moderate drinking may protect against the condition. the founder of amazon, jeff bezos, has reached the largest divorce
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settle m e nt has reached the largest divorce settlement in history with his former wife. mackenzie bezos will get a stake in the company worth more than 30 billion dollars. she will have to hand over her voting power in the company to her husband, who is the world's richest man. she sent out a tweet saying they look forward to their next phase as co—parents and friends. the time now is 7:10am. as the brexit saga continues, the president of the european council donald tusk looks set to offer the uk a flexible brexit extension. in westminster, talks between labour and the government are set to continue today to try to end the parliamentary deadlock. one anti—brexit labour backbencher who got 30 minutes of the prime minister's time yesterday was the mp rupa huq whojoins us now. good morning to you. thanks for coming on the programme. how did this meeting come about with theresa may? a couple of weeks ago she did a statement from number 10 and she kind of sad that people should... she said this brexit stalemate is not sorting and people should blame
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their mps not sorting and people should blame theirmps and not sorting and people should blame their mps and that did not go down well with me and my colleagues. so over that weekend there was a dear colleague letter, possibly meant for only conservative mps but the bbc lea ked only conservative mps but the bbc leaked it was unapologetic letter from theresa may to mps saying that if anyone has any difficulties, her door is always open. i thought i'd test her on that and when we went back on monday i read it out in the commons and asked when my meeting was. the day was yesterday. what happened in the meeting?m was. the day was yesterday. what happened in the meeting? it was in number10, happened in the meeting? it was in number 10, which i hadn't been to since i had an invitation to dinner macro from gordon brown. other mps say they used to be chewing and throwing in invitations. that was interesting in its self. the format of the meeting was a conversation and usually in the house of commons, pretty much no arguments i was
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saying she hadn't heard before. what she was saying back i've heard, as well, but usually in that confrontational, test the atmosphere of the house of commons chamber, you don't get any comeback when you ask a question. we ranged over at various brexit scenarios. my feeling was i'm not from the erg, the extreme wing of the conservatives who want brexit at any cost, any type of brexit, anything will do. i'm not from the dup, who she is in alliance with. i'm not from leaver seat, you hear seat, you hear she's been offering bribes. like to be careful about the word bribe. not to them personally, but infra structure projects for their constituencies. it has been said the government has offers for people who could be flexible in their voting preferences. it's unusual to hear from remain macro mp. how perceptive
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was she to your ideas?” from remain macro mp. how perceptive was she to your ideas? i put to her that there are a million people marching the other day in central london. i was among them. 6 million people... i said london. i was among them. 6 million people... isaid people london. i was among them. 6 million people... i said people are heightening in their attitudes, almost. some people want no deal, which is a complete crash out with no regulation. it's likejumping out ofa no regulation. it's likejumping out of a plane with no parachute. but there are also people on the remain side who want to completely rescind article 50, which is quite extreme also. the middle position between the two of those is once her deal comes back with whatever amendments and modifications, put it back to the people. the general public hasn't had a say on this since 2016, which is quite a long time ago. it's before donald trump... what does she say to that? she wasn't keen on that, i have to say. she thought the people had voted, they had taken a decision, and i was saying, well,
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the decision of this magnitude, it's worth checking with the people if they still want it. when you sign any contract you should read the terms and conditions and this is a big contract. what would that look like? what would be on the ballot paper? what question would you ask the public? ultimately it would be people like the electoral commission who decide. but you have an idea of what should be there. my preference would be, theresa may's deal, which is on the table, hasn't been voted through by mps. it's been massively rejected three times. she is saying she's in a position to change of that. when we have a version of that agreed by parliament, then we know it's workable, it's been signed off by the eu for the functioning of our country, it would fly. but that verses remain because we know that that works. that is the status quo. it's normal in things like union negotiations, when you negotiate a big change, to put that to people against what they have now. rupa huq, interesting talking to you.
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thank you for talking to us on this programme. it's coming up to 7:15am. high on a hill and the castle overlooking london... yeah sounds like a fairy! sounds like a fairy tale —— story time. if only i had some long hair to let down! good morning. i'm at severndroog castle in shooters hill in london and what a gem. 432 feet above sea level, given a spectacular view right across london. it's an agent turret, gothic, built in 1784. it has been used to test out lighthouse lights in the past. sorry, the light has fallen down. it's a bit breezy up here. we have massive views right across london with good visibility. it's a dry start. that's the crucial thing this morning because it's been one of those weeks where we've seen just about everything thrown at us from
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the skies above. through today, more of you will be dry. let's take a look at the forecast for today. it's going to feel less cold out there thanit going to feel less cold out there than it has done as we lose those northerly winds across the country. replace them with south—easterly ones. pressure has brought us very disturbed weather of late —— low pressure. it's like washing machine on its last spin, pushing out into the atlantic. it's still got some rain to give across south—west england, wales, northern ireland. one or two showers elsewhere, particular this morning across central and southern england, the midlands, towards merseyside. some rain across orkney, as well. much of mainland scotland, much of northern and eastern england, into the afternoon, will see a fair bit of sunshine developed across the country and it will feel warmer than it has with temperatures up to around 13 or 14 degrees in one or two spots. still some rain this evening as we finish the day and into the evening rush—hour across parts of south—west england, wales
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and northern ireland, heavy best at times. like today it won't rain all the time. the rain will gradually ease away as we go through the night and into saturday morning. at the same time, we develop an easterly wind across the country and that will bring cloud. low cloud into what eastern counties of scotla nd into what eastern counties of scotland and england. temperatures back into single figures through the night and one or two spots may get very close to a frost. most laces frustrate into the start of the weekend. many away from eastern coasts will have a dry day. best sunshine in the west, western england, wales especially. lovely start to the weekend. across eastern parts of scotland, eastern england, the cloud can be thick enough for apache light rain or drizzle. temperatures tomorrow fairly similar to today. always best where the sunshine is. 14 or 15 degrees. sunday, i bit more sunshine developing into eastern areas. lots of cloud around, best of blue skies
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ina of cloud around, best of blue skies in a sheltered western parts of wales, cumbria and northern ireland, but as temperatures climb up to 16 or 17 degrees across the south—east, probably around ten or 11 in the north, we could set up one or two showers into the afternoon. england and wales especially but very few in number. most will be dry and certainly a big improvement on what we've seen over the past few days. back to you both will stop i'm so impressed by that —— by you. your ability to give us the forecast and stave off a huge falling lights. yes. nearly took me out. have to try again. it was lightning fast real actions —— reactions from the weatherman. i hope you wouldn't notice. well done. john is in gloucesterfor —— gloucestershire. we are talking about raw milk. 3 million litres we re sold last year. tell us more. good
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morning. gloucestershire, this is the stroud micro dairy. doesn't get any more micro than this. a converted back of a truck or trailer, shed on the outside. it's a community supported agriculture scheme. the local people buy into what the farm is trying to do. you come in here, get your bottle. we've already seen a customer in this morning. it acts like an honesty box. you press the button and take your raw, fresh milk, unpasteurised. top it up. it comes from cows just feet away from where i'm standing. more and more people are drinking more raw milk these days. now the food standards agency has launched a consultation to try to better protect people who enjoy this type of milk. like his father and grandfather before him, jonny crickmore is a dairy farmer, but trying to make money from milk these days
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has never been harder, so at the moment around 40% of his production is focused on raw milk sold directly to the public. it's like the old days when you used to get really good milk at school. that flavour is back with this sort of thing. you can use it for all types of cooking as well. i tried it first in france when i was over there and the taste was phenomenal so to have somewhere local now is really, really good for me so i can get this. the milk we buy normally is pasteurised, heated to destroy any harmful bacteria it may contain. producing raw milk means hygiene standards have to be high. the thing you do is you want to have a visual look at the milk, make sure it's the right colour and there's nothing, no infection in the cows' quarter. secondly you would use this surgery sort of disinfectant, that goes on the cow's teat and then you go over it afterwards with this wood wool and that will get the teat as clean as you could possibly get it before you put the unit on. the past five years have seen
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an explosion in the demand for raw milk — a fivefold increase from around 600,000 litres in 2012 to more than 3 million last year. in england, wales and northern ireland, raw drinking milk can only be bought by consumers directly from the dairy farmers, so no supermarkets, for example — and in scotland it's banned from sale. now the food standards agency is undergoing a consultation looking at how the burgeoning industry should be controlled. there is no reason why we shouldn't. if we go about the next two years and prove that we can confidently sell raw milk and it can be sold anywhere in the uk safe, we shouldn't be able to allow coffee shops or, like you say, retailers to sell raw milk alongside other milks, but the great thing about it is it gives the farmer the chance to sell his products to the public again. at the fsa headquarters dr kevin hargin points out
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the increase in the number of producers up to around 180. it is though treated as a risky product. between 2015 and 2017 there were five outbreaks related to raw drinking milk involving over 100 people and many of them were children, and we had quite a few hospitalisations from those outbreaks as well, so it is a risky product. direct farm sales mean raw drinking milk is measured not in food miles but in food feet, but its being allowed to travel further afield to shops and larger retailers remains a fair distance away. here they are, the cows i was telling you about earlier and also the farm is with us. good morning. we are talking about the consultation period, about how
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quickly the industry is growing. as a dairy farmer, what do you want from the process? what would benefit you and benefit the industry? we are very proud of our milk. families that collect yet know it, their friends know it, but it would be great to be in an industry that's drove our reputation and a sense of assurance of that. the raw milk producers association together with the fsa, and we all come together to make that happen it benefits everybody. i guess the thing is that perhaps people want guaranteed 100% safety, don't they? you just can't get it with this product.” safety, don't they? you just can't get it with this product. i think you can get a very safe product. the difference is that instead of having one point where you say you are pasteurising, you just have to take it from the cow to the bottle and get all the pieces in between right. and by having an association which has standards and we are continuing
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the learning, it will get better. has standards and we are continuing the learning, it will get battenm has an inherent risk attached, but shellfish, sushi, raw fish, handling raw chicken. i guess it's a case of learning the lessons and making sure that best practice is done properly. exactly. obviously milk is very old, but this latest resurgence is quite new and this is a new experience for a lot of people. we started with one litre and it's now three or four this morning. it's a very typical example. once people taste how delicious it is then they trust it and they are happy. you've been here for about 2.5 years. you come from a farming background but what first made you decide that raw milk was the way to go? firstly i prefer drinking raw milk. milk from the
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shop gives me a tummy ache, so i thought if i like drinking it and i wa nt to thought if i like drinking it and i want to find, i may as well make it, as well. secondly, raw milk is one of the products that isn't produced ona of the products that isn't produced on a huge commercial scale. it allows smaller community farms a chance to do what they want to do. thanks very much. we will talk to you later. we also will give you a look at the outdoor milking parlour. from a very blustery stroud will send you to the new teams around the ukfor send you to the new teams around the uk for the latest news, travel and whether where you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. a man has been charged with the murder of a shopkeeper in north west london. ravi katharkamar was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened up his newsagents in pinner. 31—year—old alex gunn will appear in court later today.
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a london paddleboarder who gave up herjob to fight plastic pollution is calling on the public to help tackle the problem. lizzie carr set up the app plastic patrol. users photograph and tag the location of plastic waste to reveal where the hotspots are. it's already helped identify nearly 200 tonnes of rubbish — that's equivalent to the weight of 15 million water bottles. we've logged 80,000 examples of plastic pollution in an app, which has helped us understand what the problem looks like all over the world and gather really important data so that we can put accountability back in the hands of those responsible. so i think individual actions, you know, they all add up. a charity has launched a new scheme aimed at helping reunite homeless people with their families. the group missing people says the online tool will check if a homeless person has been reported missing and then they'll offer to let their family and friends know they're safe and ask if they'd like to be reunited. it's being backed by the mayor, who's given the project
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£62,000. the queen elizabeth park celebrates its fifth birthday today. a celebration's being held to mark the anniversary of the venue in stratford being transformed and re—opened to the public following the 2012 games. since then it's thought around 27 million people have visited. now the weather. hello, good morning. if you've been feeling the chill over the last couple of days or so, you will be pleased to know that today is looking warmer. it should also stay dry and there'll be plenty of sunshine around at times.
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but it's a bit of a cloudy start to the day. it's milder out there than it was this time yesterday. a lot of that cloud is set to clear its way westwards as we head through the morning, but always more cloud the further west you are. the best of the brightness and the sunshine today will tend to be towards eastern areas. staying dry, bit of a south—easterly breeze going on, but it's that wind that's dragging up the milder air from the near continent. we'll see highs today between 11, maybe as high as 13 or 14 celsius. now, through this evening and overnight, there'll be more cloud developing. clear skies at first and cloud pushes in from the east but it should stay dry. overnight lows between 4 and 5 but turning milder into tomorrow morning. now, over the weekend we've got an easterly wind, so always cooler towards eastern areas but highs of 14 degrees. dry on saturday, warmer still on sunday, but with the chance of some afternoon showers. that's all for now — i'll be back in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the european council president, donald tusk, could offer uk a flexible brexit extension of one year according to a senior eu official. under the plan, to be put to eu leaders at a special summit next week, britain would have the option of leaving earlier, if parliament ratified a deal. meanwhile, the attorney general geoffrey cox has said there's likely to be a lengthy brexit delay if cross—party talks with jeremy corbyn don't succeed. the boss of boeing has admitted for the first time that a failure in the aircraft's anti—stall system was a factor in the crash of two of its max 8 planes. chief executive dennis muilenburg made the statement promising to fix the fault after a preliminary report
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into the crash found the pilots "repeatedly" followed procedures recommended by boeing before the crash. labour has held onto its seat in newport west, in a by—election triggered by the death of mp paul flynn. ruthjones won with a reduced majority for the party. the conservatives also lost ground, while ukip tripled its vote share to 9%. turnout was higher than predicted at 37%. the man accused of killing 50 people in last month's terror attacks on two mosques in new zealand has been ordered to undergo mental health tests. after brenton tarrant appeared in court via video link, thejudge ruled he would undergo psychiatric assessments to determine if he was fit to stand trial. he faces 50 murder charges and 39 attempted murder charges. a man accused of carrying out a series of knife attacks last weekend has been charged with five counts of attempted murder. the attacks in edmonton in north london began on saturday night. 29—year—old jason kakaire will appear before magistrates later today. one or two alcoholic drinks a day
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is enough to increase the chances of having a stroke by as much as 15% according to a new study. researchers from china and the university of oxford say their findings disprove previous claims that light—to—moderate drinking may protect against the condition. the founder of amazon, jeff bezos, has reached the largest divorce settlement in history with his former wife. mackenzie bezos will get a stake in the company worth more than $30 billion. she will have to hand over her voting power in the company to her husband, who is the world's richest man. she sent out a tweet saying they look forward to their next phase as co—parents and friends. mention britain's spy agency, gchq, and you think of secret corridors and rooms full of high—tech gadgets. but a revelation today paints a very different picture. this is it, simple, plain, red brick been building, squashed between a pub and a tube station in central
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london. this was home to intelligence officers for 66 years. the secret can only be revealed today because they've moved out. gchq's main site is in cheltenham but it's keeping a base in london too. we just don't know where it is. matt will have the weather soon, a beautiful location. i was impressed with matt's reaction, a light started falling down and he continued unfazed. and still carrying on the forecast. i think we picked it up and it is on social media. we will go back to another wearying story. this follows the chanting at danny rose and other england players. since then we have seen two players
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walking off because one of the players was getting racist attributes so it has reached this tipping point and it seems only a matter of time before a senior team walks off the field. danny rose, one of the main victims of the abuse in montenegro, says it's enough for him to wa nt montenegro, says it's enough for him to want to quit the game because he says the punishments handed down to clu bs a re says the punishments handed down to clubs are farcical, he joked that they are getting fined less than he spends on a night out in london, making the point that punishments aren't enough. danny rose is accusing the authorities of not doing enough to stamp down on clubs whose fans are guilty of racist abuse. rose was a victim of racist chanting during england's euro 2020 win over montenegro just last month, and has told the bbc he can't wait to see
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the back of football, because of this. at the minute how i programme myself now, i just think that i've got five or six more years left in football and i just can't wait to see the back of it. seeing how things are done in the game at the minute, it's just whatever, so just have to get on with it. that's sad. yeah, totally. i've got five or six more yea rs left. i just want to enjoy football as much as i can and there's so many politics and whatever, i just can't wait to see the back of it, to be honest. england's women play a world cup warm—up against canada tonight and manager phil neville hopes he'd be brave enough to take his players off the field, if he heard any racist abuse. we can no longer keep sweeping things under the carpet with a £10,000, £20,000 fine, half a stadium, because i'm not sure we're getting to the bottom of the real issue. i think if we have the courage
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and we have the backing, more importantly, to maybe bring the team off, to stop the game, say, "right, this is not good enough, we're going to punish the supporters that are causing the problems", then i think, i hope, i would have the courage to do that. yes, let's hope he doesn't have to. next to aintree. its ladies day to day but we reflect on a surprise when on the first day of the festival. the two—time cheltenham champion hurdle winner and favourite, buveur d'air, was beaten in the aintree hurdle by supasundae, who's trained byjessica harrington and ridden by robbie power. the main event on saturday is, of course, the grand national. the 40 runners have been confirmed, including last year's winner tiger roll, who's the favourite. jonny bairstow‘s good form in the indian premier league has continued. after a century last week, he smashed a quickfire 48 against dehli capitals, to help the sunrisers hyderabad to the top off the table. to the top of the table. bairstow is the second leading run
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scorer in the competition. but back home, what a contrast for the leeds rhinos. they remain stuck to the bottom of the super league table after another heavy defeat to hull kr. the multiple super league winners conceded seven tries — including this in last move, of the game from ben crooks — as they lost 45—26. hull kr move up to seventh in the table. let's end with a nicer football story. raheem sterling will have his own fan club cheering him on as manchester city take on brighton in the fa cup semifinal this weekend. the england forward and his club have arranged for 550 students from his old school, the ark elvin academy in london, to be at wembley on saturday. ticket and transport costs are being provided for the pupils, to get to and from the match. and there he is visiting that current crop of classmates at the school and a special day it was for them, and some of those might be brighton fans, they don't all have
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to beat manchester city fans. just a day after harry said the video game fortnite should be banned it has won a major award. his words add to our growing debate about whether gaming addiction can be harmful to health. in the uk industry gaming is worth more than £7 billion, and more than half of that was spent on digital and online games. joining us now is dr amir khan, who prescribed an 11—year—old patient to stay off video games for two weeks, james good, a former game addict, and racheal gregg smythe, a video game producer. james, i think you are the place to start, tell us about, how much gaming were you doing, you had just
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started university? it was during university when it really got bad, up university when it really got bad, up to 12 hours a day especially at weekends and at 1.1 went up to 32 hours straight. were you playing games where you were in contact with other people or were you solitary? it was a bit of a mix but i preferred the games where i could get lost in a fantasy world. why, we re get lost in a fantasy world. why, were you not enjoying university?m was to escape my problems. i had coursework and assignments building up, i wasn't the most social person, i was quite introverted and when i was in that world i could beat someone was in that world i could beat someone else. what was the impact it had on your life? it started with serious depression and mental health
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issues and that then spiralled onto me dropping out of university, i lost relationships and friends and it went downhill from there. people will be interested to know what is the end of the story, where are you at now? i'm currently seven months game three three, i am a web designer and photographer, iwork foran designer and photographer, iwork for an organisation called game quitters helping other people throughout the journey, i spend time outdoors and have great friends. what was the turning point for you, but i think that made you able to stop doing what's been called an addiction? i think it was seeing how my life was going to end up if i carried on playing games. i didn't wa nt to carried on playing games. i didn't want to keep working as a waiter and playing video games all day and
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during university i sought help for this issue and it was at four year battle to this point but i came out much stronger. doctor khan, you prescribed two weeks of games, i didn't even know you are allowed to do that —— two weeks off games. you can understand saying to someone don't drink or smoke, not a physical addiction but to describe note gaming... this is a newer think we are having to do, a patient i saw came in with his mum, he was 11 and she complained he was tired all the time and wasn't doing well in school, wasn't interested in anything else and she thought there was something physically wrong and then when we unpicked things we found out he was playing games well into the night, he didn't want to get up for school and he was doing
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badly and i spoke to a colleague yesterday to sort someone at a similar age who started wetting themselves during the day and it transpired they didn't want to go to the toilet, they were so lost in these games. the point james made was it isn't just these games. the point james made was it isn'tjust you start playing games and get addicted, there are other issues, you said you found it difficult to socialise, it's difficult to socialise, it's difficult to socialise, it's difficult to pin everything on gaming. there are some cases where gaming. there are some cases where gaming is good, it works for people with autistic spectrum disorder and learning difficulties but that doesn't take away from the fact they are addicted and there isn't that ca re are addicted and there isn't that care that other people get with smoking and alcohol and they are targeting children, that's the most worrying thing. rachel, you have listened to a lot, there is a danger that your industry is painted as the
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bad guys here, how do you see this, we hear stories like james's how do you see it, this extraordinary industry and there is an amazing artistry around a lot of things and yet we hear stories like this. it's a difficult topic because the evidence is there that some games can become addictive in certain ways, the interesting thing for me is trying to balance how there seems to bea is trying to balance how there seems to be a lot of approach that falls on the industry to solve this problem. in my experience games aren't inherently designed to be addictive to children. games are designed specifically like fortnite asa designed specifically like fortnite as a service to designed specifically like fortnite as a service to encourage designed specifically like fortnite as a service to encourage people to keep playing the game and be involved in it. we have been told that games are designed to be
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addictive, to keep you coming back for more, to get to that next level with teasers and that's the point, if you play a game and it becomes popular, it's our business.” if you play a game and it becomes popular, it's our business. i think as someone popular, it's our business. i think as someone in the industry i would separate the word addictive from being a game that encourages people to stay in the game and have fun. it's only when people cannot really control how much they play the game and how they want to play and play that it becomes a bit of a problem. it makes me think of the gambling campaign, when the fun stops, stop. that message isn't put out by the industry. it's not in the same way for gambling but certain games are being more self aware of what they are doing now i'm starting to put messages in loading screens, they will tell you to take a break.
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james, we are hearing that message from the industry but do you think they will take these issues seriously? do you think there is a change now? there has definitely been a shift in the view of people seeing a video game addiction and games like fortnite, especially in the last few months with a parliamentary inquiry is in government and news stories, ijust think we need to keep raising awareness that there are people who struggle with video game addiction and some people are perfectly fine with gaming but there are a small subset of people, 2% — 4% of gamers who will struggle with gaming addiction and if we can do what we can to help them that is our priority. and anyone who is
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concerned, priority. and anyone who is concerned , gamers priority. and anyone who is concerned, gamers or parents, just get in touch with a gp? there are charities we can point them towards and it is an addiction, there are withdrawal effects when they stop playing. thank you all for that chat, i'm sure we have views on this, please let us know. let's get out into the fresh air, where matt is this morning. where are you? good morning, i'm at the top of seven druid castle on shooters hill in south london, seeing one of the best viewing points of the city but it has a 360 degrees, look at the sunrise out towards the east, beautiful start to the day and a sign that things will get better across many parts of the country, not sunshine reflecting over the clouds and also through the trees,
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as well as having the great views it surrounded by oxley word, which day back around 8000 years. really a stunning place to visit, and you can visit on sunday and take in the view but a bit chilly and breezy but if anything in the next few days it won't be as cold as it has been, turning milder and a bit drier after a bit of weather bingo in the last few days, rain, sleet and snow, but today we still have low pressure that's been responsible for disturbed conditions but think of it asa disturbed conditions but think of it as a washing machine on its last spin, pushing the last bits of the washing around across parts of south—west england, wales and northern ireland, some of the rain will heavy but it won't be all day long. across the rest of scotland
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and parts of north—east england, one or two isolated showers but most having a dry day, more sunshine around and not feeling as cold, temperatures could peak around 13 or 14 celsius. tonight we still have some rain across wales, south—west england and northern ireland, that inches away as low pressure pulls off into the atlantic, many will become dry for a time in 12 there will be clear skies around, may be temperatures close enough for a touch of frost but mostly frost—free into the weekend. saturday at most places dry, we have an easterly breeze developing so it will be chilly and cloudy in the east, the cloud will move west but for parts of western england and northern ireland sitting under blue skies, temperatures up to 15 celsius which
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should feel proud pleasant. there should feel proud pleasant. there should be some sunshine on sunday, maybe a few more breaks to eastern areas than saturday, the best sunshine in sheltered parts of wales, northern ireland and cumbria as temperatures creep up to maybe 17 celsius in southern areas we could catch one or two showers, may the odd heavy one, further north temperatures will be around 10 or 11 degrees but after everything in the last few days, the weather looking quieter this weekend. matt, i'm intrigued about where you are so maybe we can get a few shots of it later on because it looks like you are looking out but we don't know where from. i'm looking out from shooters hill and there is canary wharf behind you. ben is going to talk us through some figures out this morning. the co—operative
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group. we are talking about the co—operative group. it has shops and funeral homes. we heard that figures —— food sale profits are up 4.4%. and pre—tax profits are up 27%. let's speak to the boss, steve morels. a good set of figures given that we know how tough it is right there, there is so much competition and food is doing pretty well. we are and food is doing pretty well. we a re pretty and food is doing pretty well. we are pretty pleased with the overall number, two years of consecutive profit growth now and our food business has been the real standout.
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we moved into convenience retailing and that is proving it right for us and that is proving it right for us and the purchase in wholesaling gives us new growth to get after. it says we are now starting to resonate with things people care about in areas where we are different, we talked about education, they are concerned about skills in the workplace, today we announced 50 million of our pension front went into social housing and homelessness isa into social housing and homelessness is a real issue and going back to local causes, these are things people are caring about, we are in that space and they are coming your way. the co-op group has had a tough time is like, we sought headlines related to the bank which you have now sold off and you are still sort of the co—op that we know and rememberfrom of the co—op that we know and remember from childhood been of the co—op that we know and rememberfrom childhood been and sharing. we haven't lost that, that
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sits at the centre of the organisation we are but we are building a modern co—op. we are 175 yea rs old building a modern co—op. we are 175 years old this year, i'm building a business that will be around for another 175 years creating jobs, investing in infrastructure and making sure we look after our colleagues. but it is a tough time out there, we talked about that merger between sainsbury‘s and asda which would create a huge competitor for you and we have also seen the rise of the discounters and you don't do online delivery and i know thatis don't do online delivery and i know that is what m&s has been looking at, they said that is the only way they will compete on food, so why are you not doing it? home delivery is an area we are looking at, we are running some trials, we have robots
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delivering products to people's homes in milton keynes, we have started using electric bikes, zero emissions and they are taking products to people's flats and homes that are within a mile of our store, so our that are within a mile of our store, so our focus is that are within a mile of our store, so ourfocus is more that are within a mile of our store, so our focus is more about convenience little and often, not so much about the big weekly shops that i think is more looking backwards to how people shop. people are shopping more regularly. are you ruling out ordering on line, the likes of your competitors are doing? we are focused around providing an online delivery service but in a different way, not a basket shop of 70 or £80 but more at topshop of around £15. we think it has some exciting opportunities. i spoke to a food manufacturer yesterday and they were
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worried about supplies ahead of brexit. we still don't have clarity on what will happen. how are you preparing and what does the current impasse mean for you?” preparing and what does the current impasse mean for you? i think we are in better placed than most, we struck a deal with the uk farmers three years ago to buy british product, that gives us some insolation, we are keeping stock in covered areas that has a long shelf life and we have good relations with our suppliers, what worries me is that brexit is dividing communities andi that brexit is dividing communities and i mentioned about skills and education but we are not facing into knife crime orjob creation, the things that we need to get back on the agenda but we are in a relatively good shape. i always said certainty is that best thing for us, we haven't had that and pushing it
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out further solve that.” we haven't had that and pushing it out further solve that. i also want to ask about the big part of your business, funeral homes, and necessary pa rt business, funeral homes, and necessary part of all our lives at some point. there was criticism about providers or funerals that we re about providers or funerals that were charging too much, you were all told to cut your costs. this is a market that is going through rapid change and we are leading that change. i've been talking to the cma for many months and encouraged them to come into the sector. we think it needs regulation and we had been facing into more affordable products bringing our prices down at the front end which i think is important ata front end which i think is important at a difficult time and there is a real shift that we spoke about before where it's becoming more a celebration of life and so affordability will become more important. i'm sure we will talk
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about it more again. steve, good to see you. more on pensions for you, we will have more on that later. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... flea bag tells the story of a young woman navigating that messy business of modern life. it was one of those programmes that started out word of mouth and has become a huge success. i'm in the middle of the second series and won't let anyone tell me what's going on. time to get the news and travel where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. a man has been charged with the murder of a shopkeeper in north west london. ravi katharkamar was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened up his newsagents in pinner. 31—year—old alex gunn will appear
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in court later today. a london paddleboarder who gave up herjob to fight plastic pollution is calling on the public to help tackle the problem. lizzie carr set up the app plastic patrol — users photograph and tag the location of plastic waste to reveal where the hotspots are. good morning from bbc london news. it's already helped identify nearly 200 tonnes of rubbish — equivalent to the weight of 15 million water bottles. we've logged 80,000 examples of plastic pollution in an app, which has helped us understand what the problem looks like all over the world and gather really important data so that we can put accountability back in the hands of those responsible. so i think individual actions, you know, they all add up. a charity has launched a new scheme aimed at helping reunite homeless people with their families. the group missing people says the online tool will check if a homeless person has been reported missing and then they'll offer to let their family and friends know they're safe and ask if they'd like to be reunited. it's being backed by the mayor,
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who's given the project £62,000. the queen elizabeth olympic park celebrates its fifth birthday today. a celebration's being held to mark the anniversary of the venue in stratford being transformed and re—opened to the public following the 2012 games. since then it's thought around 27 million people have visited. a look at the travel: the bakerloo the ba kerloo line the bakerloo line did had minor delays, we have just the bakerloo line did had minor delays, we havejust heard it has cleared up but minor delays on the overgrown between euston and watford junction. there is disruption because of a faulty train, through purley, and on the m25 we have long delays anticlockwise from junction 26 to junction 23. delays anticlockwise from junction 26 tojunction 23. the weather now. hello, good morning. if you've been feeling the chill
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over the last couple of days or so, you will be pleased to know that today is looking warmer. it should also stay dry and there'll be plenty of sunshine around at times. but it's a bit of a cloudy start to the day. it's milder out there than it was this time yesterday. a lot of that cloud is set to clear its way westwards as we head through the morning, but always more cloud the further west you are. the best of the brightness and the sunshine today will tend to be towards eastern areas. staying dry, bit of a south—easterly breeze going on, but it's that wind that's dragging up the milder air from the near continent. we'll see highs today between 11, maybe as high as 13 or 14 celsius. now, through this evening and overnight, there'll be more cloud developing. clear skies at first and cloud pushes in from the east but it should stay dry. overnight lows between 4 and 6 but turning milder into tomorrow morning. now, over the weekend we've got an easterly wind, so always cooler towards eastern areas but highs of 14 degrees. dry on saturday, warmer still on sunday, but with the chance of some afternoon showers. that's all for now.
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you can hear more from us in half an hour.
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